Film Review: The Rover

// Share this content....Straight out of the future Australian Outback The Rover will intrigue you from the moment it starts; captivating its audience with its overpowering use of sound, in particular […]">
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Straight out of the future Australian Outback The Rover will intrigue you from the moment it starts; captivating its audience with its overpowering use of sound, in particular the stark contrast between silence, dialogue and music. The sound was almost used to cut between scenes, which made them almost seem jumpy but in a good way, you hear every breath and every footstep.

This deliberate use of distinct sound sits well with the pace of the film; there is no particular rush to the story. It’s a bit like Dude Where’s My Car in as much as there’s this dude, played by the extraordinarily talented Guy Pearce, looking for his car. Admittedly that is where the similarity ends, as it is gritty and dark not ridiculous or funny. Even for the most desensitised of audiences this film has the ability to shock with its sudden graphic violence.

Another shock was the acting, having previously avoided all films starring Robert Pattinson, it was a surprise to see how unbelievably talented he is.  Pattinson gives an almost Oscar worthy performance as the vulnerable young Rey, wiping the floor with Guy Pearce’s portrayal of the hardened loner Eric, a massive feat in itself.  He is definitely much more than a pretty face, which he actually hides quite well in this movie.

In fact there is nothing pretty about this film, not the actors, not the story, not the sound, which makes the Australian Outback a perfect backdrop for it; its barren and full of dull colours, which is also fitting as it is set at a time after an economic collapse.  However this story could have been told at any time, the only difference being the lack of authority, and the heavy hand when they do appear, not necessarily by them either.  There is no other reference for the period other than an opening line explaining that it is 10 years after the collapse, the focus of the story is actually nothing to do with the collapse, its literally just about Eric looking for his car.

It is very slow and may not keep everyone’s attention throughout, as it could be seen as just one massive drawn out over reaction to a car theft, but go see it if you don’t like midgets, love Guy Pearce and want to be shocked by graphic violence.

Broadway is showing this every day at 17:45 & 8:30 until 28th August for more information click here

Review by Josie Opal

 

 

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