Theatre Review: A Touch of Danger

// Share this content.... A Touch of Danger is billed as part of the Theatre Royal’s Thriller Season. Its performance in Nottingham on Tuesday evening was the first in its four […]">
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A Touch of Danger is billed as part of the Theatre Royal’s Thriller Season. Its performance in Nottingham on Tuesday evening was the first in its four day run, telling the story of Max Telligan’s life spiralling out of control – shock endings and plot twists abound in the tale of terrorist turmoil. As a lover of crime thrillers and all things mysterious, I was excited to see what this show had to offer. Unfortunately for us, it wasn’t much. As we slowly dragged our way through the first half, there were some laughs to be had – although perhaps not at the right point.

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Set entirely in the living room of our protagonist’s London flat, the play lurched to its conclusion with more of a wheeze than a bang. Although the decision to set the play in its original period of the 1980s meant that the costuming was excellent fun, avoiding the 80s cliché shoulder pads and jangling beads. Some inventive staging was employed for the flashback scene, which was done very smoothly.

The stand out performance came from Jacqueline Gilbride as Harriet Telligan, Max’s sloaney estranged wife, who’s wild over acting and hammy delivery truly stole the limelight at her every appearance. But the chemistry between her and the lead, John Goodrum, was a redeeming feature of the evening. That being said, it felt the show lacked conviction across the board. Moments which could have really upped the ante were left floundering by the delivery of the actors. All in all, the only moments of realism were when the phone caught on the lampshade.

For more information about this show and upcoming ones in the Crime Thriller Season please click here.

Review by Jen Harrison

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